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Episode 184

You Made It Weird

Casey Wilson

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You Made It Weird #184: Casey Wilson

Casey Wilson (Happy Endings! Ass Backwards!) makes it weird!

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30 comments

  • atrolstogly is a COol science WOOF i mean TRASNCENDA ETAL METDITATION and LUCIS D DREAMING AR e u serious YET you would QUESTION ASTROLSIGS?????????????? dumb FUCKCEING PEOPLE FUCK u pORTOMAN ps WHAT THE HELL WHYAT ARE WE ALL DOINGN ON THE NREDIST WEB SIGHT GODdANMIT

  • Maybe it’s different if you’re going from one faith to another, or at least starting from a spiritual background, but just hearing about someone deciding to convert to a religion (mostly) sight unseen really made me feel uncomfortable.

  • What a stereotypically vapid, empty person feigning some kind of depth. She’s the kind of idiot that believes in astrology despite it being unquestionably debunked, not to mention the vomit-inducing surface level “spiritual” garbage with absolutely no weight behind it. And she’s converting to Judaism for her fiance? Yeah, it’s a VERY feminist move to change your entire religious worldview to something you don’t know about at all just to please a man and his family.

    Pete: it’s clear that having a TV show is taking its toll on your podcast. If this is the caliber of guest we have to endure, please stick to the TV show which is actually funny. It’s hilarious, actually.

  • Jim, you know you’re welcome to not listen to this free podcast. It sounds like you have some unresolved issues with someone Casey reminds you of. I hope everything works out for you.

  • I used to have a crush on Casey, as I think she’s a talented, funny actress, but this interview was a major turn off. I cannot believe there are people who believe in astrology in 2013. People in L.A. clearly have way too much free time. And religious conversion for every wrong reason… Shameful.

  • Mark-

    Whether I have unresolved issues or not doesn’t invalidate what I said (good job immediately pulling out an ad hominem, though). I could be the happiest person in the world and it wouldn’t make astrology any less ridiculous or this “spiritual” bullshit any less transparently false. Don’t even get me started on that charlatan Deepak Chopra.

    Oh, and don’t quit your day job; you’re terrible at psychoanalyzing people over the internet.

  • I’ve seen Kulap get shit too whenever she talks about astrology on Who Charted and other podcasts. Why does it bug you guys that much, people are free to believe in whatever they want.

  • I’m with Mark on this one Jim. The kind of person who would take the time to actively attack another person for sharing their views even if they’re not in line with your own…I mean…you’re an asshole, Jim. An ugly, mouthfrothing, uptight, rude asshole. That’s my psychoanalysis. Talk about an empty person feigning depth. You’ve clearly got some issues and I think it would be better for everyone involved, including yourself, if you worked them out in a therapist’s office rather than the comments section.

    Ugh. What is it about even the mention of astrology that brings out the hideous, self –important, loudmouthed, wannabe intellectuals out of the woodwork. Go away. You invariably trigger my desire to type out long-winded, descriptive, comma-separated lists and that’s just not healthy and it’s not me. Fuggoff.

    Anyway, I really identified with the bit about being too emotionally overwhelmed by good things that happen in life to react the way I’m expected to. There’s a parable about a boy in an ancient village. He captures a wild horse that he can use to help out on his father’s farm and all of the villagers gossip about how great this is, but the village wise man says “We’ll see.” Then, while the boy is taming the horse, he’s thrown to the ground and breaks his leg. The villagers gossip about how terrible this is, but the village wise man says “We’ll see.” A week later the army comes around and starts conscripting villagers into service to conquer a foreign land, but they can’t take the boy because his leg is broken. The villagers gossip about how great this is, but the village wise man says “We’ll see.”

    I think that as we get older and begin to recognize cycles and patterns in life and human behavior we become more like the wise man; more objective. And yet we’re caught in this limbo between subjectivity and objectivity in which we know that a “good” thing can bring bad things and that a “bad” thing can bring good things, and instead of calming us like the wise man it causes every emotion at once. We feel joy and fear when something joyful happens and there’s nothing to do except escape, power down, and slowly process. But is that necessarily a good thing? Should we be on an even keel at all times never feeling the joy or the pain? Perhaps the trick is to be a dumb villager when something good happens and a wise man when something bad happens, but do we necessarily have control over that? Things to ponder.

  • Enoe-

    I agree that people are, and should be, free to believe what they want. I would never want to see a belief system mandated or banned by law. That said, simply because you have the right to believe something does not mean you get to be free of criticism of that belief.

    It bothers me to hear people talk about astrology for several reasons. First and foremost, it is false. There is a 0% chance that astrology works, as has been demonstrated repeatedly in controlled studies; that is, assuming we even make it past the glaring logical problems with it. The astrological systems developed around the world don’t agree with one another, so it’s not even self-consistent bullshit.

    Second, it rests on logical fallacies that, while generally benign when applied to astrology, can be dangerous if carried over into other areas of life.

    Third, it’s absolutely heinous to hear astrology being touted by rich people in the First World as the reason things happen. Fuck sociology, economics, and history; look at the sky if you want to explain why poor people starve to death everyday! It absolves us of our responsibility to other people by giving us an excuse for their misfortunes.

    Finally, on a personal level, it bothers me because belief in astrology is always touted as an oh-so-transparent attempt to make oneself seem deep. It has no rituals or demands of its adherents, which might inconvenience somebody, but it does offer a feel-good salve to people too stupid to understand science and too vapid to dedicate any real time to understanding causality. People who believe in astrology are not interesting or deep because of it, they’re just foolish.

    Anecdope-

    Boohoo, I criticized someone’s nonsensical worldview. Don’t you have some blasphemy laws that need passing so you can kill or imprison people who disagree with you?

    And what a well-made point! Oh wait, nope. What I meant to say was “Wow, what a bunch of pointless ad hominem attacks. You said bad things about me on the internet, so you must be right!” By the way, try doing a single Google search to find out what “real” intellectuals think about astrology- BUT BE CAREFUL!!!!! Some of them might disagree and hurt your widdle feewings. Then again, maybe it’s just a big conspiracy propagated by all the “wannabe” intellectuals.

  • You didn’t criticize her world view. You criticized her for holding that world view, and you acted like a dick while you did it. I don’t happen to believe in astrology, but astrology makes just as much sense as any other set of beliefs that can be proven or disproven at a whim with a conveniently cherry picked set of statistics and studies. You’re missing the point. If world view informed by astrology, or Christianity, or Judaism, or Islam, or Hinduism, or Mormonism, or Deepak fucking Chopra makes a person feel more in tune with their surroundings, or more alive, or better about themselves, or if it makes it easier for them to be a better human being, then who the hell are you to call them degrading names for holding those beliefs. Grow the hell up and worry about the plank in your own eye.

  • Jim (Jimmy) Smith,
    I regret to inform you that your right to listen to this podcast has been revoked by the Podcasters Association of America. Further attempts to listen to YMIW will cause the searing pain in your head to continue or possibly worsen.
    Based on your personal opinions YMIW is probably not the right podcast for you. This podcast is dedicated to an open dialogue about stupid beliefs including religion, pseudo-science & conspiracy theories.
    I assume you have never listened before, since this is quite typical for YMIW and this is the 184th podcast. That or you’ve just been quiet up to this point when Mercury Retrograde has shifted and you became a total dickhead.
    I’m sorry that your privilege to listen has been revoked. We welcome you to start your own podcast focusing on how dumb everyone else is and I’m sure you will get many followers.

    Sincerely,
    Josh D. Gutterman
    Assistant Secretary with the PAA

  • josh-

    I listen to the show and watch the TV show because Pete is funny, and actually puts thought into his searching for meaning in life. Do I agree with everything he believes? No. But at least he’s putting in some effort, unlike most of the last few guests.

  • Jim,

    After some thought I’d like to say this: your arguments against astrology make a lot of sense. You’ve made several valid points on that subject and you made them well, and I don’t want you to walk away from this interaction thinking that they went unheard.

    Where myself, and clearly a few others, took issue wasn’t with your views on astrology, but rather the way you used them to justify a sense of superiority over others and the way you expressed that feeling of superiority.

    If you want to look at astrology as a crutch and an excuse for people to not be their best, most discerning, responsible selves, then that’s your prerogative. My guess, though, is that there isn’t a person alive, including you, who doesn’t do things that are bad for themselves in order to make it through the day. My guess is that you’ve probably had a drink of alcohol in your life, or a hit of weed, or a cigarette, or you’ve duped yourself into thinking someone in a relationship cared about you when they didn’t, or chewed your nails, or watched TV when you should’ve been doing something productive, or done any number of harmful things to yourself in order to feel good in the short term. We all do.

    I don’t believe that anybody would fault you for politely expressing that, IN YOUR OPINION, a person is doing something wrong or harmful and explaining why. Judgement, though? Animosity? When you boil it down far enough we’re all the same. Who are you to judge? What’s the sense in being unnecessarily hurtful? You’re only underwriting another person’s desire to, at some point, treat you just as poorly.

    Please, in the name of promoting a world where people aren’t afraid to be themselves for fear of being treated like garbage and emotionally or physically harmed, be more considerate next time. Thank you.

    P.S. I’m sorry I called you an ugly, mouthfrothing, uptight, rude asshole. I only meant that you were acting like one at the time. I really don’t know you from Adam, so while you may or may not be all of those things, I really shouldn’t have made the assumption one way or the other.

  • I enjoyed the discussion about marriage and the slightly awkward asking Casey how to stop it from going sideways. Then Pete mentioned the Buddha saying that pain is trying to maintain permanence in a world that is impermanent. My personal answer to his question for Casey would be to slightly skew that mindset on marriage. I do think that viewing marriage as “locking something in” is sure to end in failure and probably what most people do. Pete always says that he wouldn’t be worried about death if he gets to do it with a friend. That’s really how to view marriage. It’s not trying to freeze time, but rather have a partner to step through time with. No one is going to stop evolving, but it’s a choice to evolve together and grow together. Honestly that might mean growing apart, but it also might mean growing near someone you love. It also means there’s no reason to force anything. Friends can fulfill this need, but are far less personally challenging that a spouse.

    Also, my take on sad dad’s was also hit on in this episode. I think the key to fighting Sad Dad Syndrome (SDS) is to not make your wife your mom in the first place. Everyone needs love and attention, but part of evolving into a man/woman is that you fend for yourself physically and emotionally. If you want to be taken care of forever you’ll end up sad, dad or otherwise. Being a grown up can fucking suck, but it’s also rewarding. Maybe we need to go the other way with our terminology and drop marriage altogether and go with partner, cause that’s really what it is. It’s a partner you choose to fight the battle with, you help each other up and move forward as a team. If you’re looking for a bang-mom or daddy 2.0 you’re not doing the work, and that usually results in sadness.

  • To All,

    First, Jim Smith’s points are entirely valid, well thought out, and well-worded.

    Second, I wanted to believe this would be as touching and human as the June Diane Raphael episode. It wasn’t.

    Third and nevertheless, Pete did everything he could to make this episode worth listening to.

    Parallel to that, Pete and his writing staff have done a great job with the show. It incorporates so many amazing elements from the podcast and Pete’s act while remaining spontaneous and emphasizing the same relatable qualities in every guest that Weirdos have come to expect from Pete’s interviews.

    In conclusion, this episode disappointed me because I wanted to believe that Casey Wilson would expose herself in the same way that June and Kulap did. But, Pete never disappointed me for a moment.

    Thanks Pete,

    Jonny Fudwicker

  • Good lord with this comment section. Came here to say I thoroughly enjoyed this episode! Casey is such a delight. So fun and open and funny and lovely. Really, really charming. I really had no idea astrology was such a touchy subject! I assumed Weirdos were more open than that, and the alternative saddens me.

    I also just wanted to say that the guy who said something about Casey converting religions for her future husband is real feminist, all sarcastic like, that maybe he should reassess what feminism is. The beauty of feminism lies in the CHOICE. You, a man, deciding what is best for a woman is misogyny at its finest. She, a woman, is making the choice to convert religions and her reasons behind that shouldn’t really matter. It’s her choice, and that’s the point of feminism.