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Episode 37

The Alton Browncast

Kevin Brauch

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The Alton Browncast #37: Kevin Brauch

Alton Brown asks Kevin Brauch how he got the Drinking Robot nickname, hears a vintage speech about McDonald’s hamburgers, and defends his fruitcake. All this, and why Kevin slapped Alton and shouted down the hall of the Food Network studios.

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5 comments

  • https://soundcloud.com/inquiringminds/41-amy-stewart-the-science-behind-the-worlds-alcohol

    Great episode. Since I’m playing catch up a bit, I listened to this podcast right after another one about alcohol, and some of the things Alton and Kevin were curious about are talked about in the other podcast, mainly regarding the medicinal properties of alcohol and appéritifs/digéstifs. The link above is for that podcast for those who’d like a listen.

  • Great fun. However, it saddens me that, being in Canada, his forebears caved in to the Frogs all around them mangling the family name(if his people are German, his name isn’t “Brawsh”, it’s “Browḉ”, with the last sound slightly harder than the Scottish “loch”–raise your tongue toward the roof of your mouth, as if to make a “k” sound, but leave a bit of room for air to pass over; if you just can’t get the hang of it, “k’ is better than “sh”–ch=”sh” is a French thing). Better to say “LEEB-frow-Milk” than “LEEB-frow-Milsh”; “Milch” is, after all, “Milk”(like when Reuben Blades tells people either pronunciation of his last name is fine, since it’s just the same name/same object in two different languages).
    As for Scotch, I’m with Mr Brauch; I tend to like the Speyside & the Glens(although there are lovely potions from all the regions), my favorite being Glenmorangie 10yr-old.
    And he’s right about the Europeans being way ahead of us on herbal flavors(although given Jeagermeister’s popularity here, you’d think it wouldn’t be such a hard sell–but, then, 90% of the Jaegermeister consumed here is slammed down by people too drunk to taste anything but raw lemons or hot sauce, much less subtle botanicals). I’d have to ask my brother(who spends time in southern Germany &/or Austria every year) what exactly the name was, but there was a lovely herbal liqueur made by a particular order of nuns that I’d love to get more of, originally made for medicinal use(lozenges like Riccola are just the non-alky, practical way to carry such cures with you).