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Episode 3

The Alton Browncast

Keith Schroder

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The Alton Browncast #3: Keith Schroeder

Find out what Alton thinks is the grossest part of the 4th of July holiday. Then, Keith Schroeder of High Road Ice Cream stops by to geek out on summer’s coldest and creamiest treat. You’ll want to bring your spoon.

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16 comments

  • Sorry guys, this is a show about food and cooking, expect there to be food consumed and smacked and get over it.

    This has quickly become my favourite podcast. Cannot wait to listen to the rest.
    Thanks!

  • While, as an Atlantan, I adore Alton Brown…

    I second Chris’ comment being grossed out by the smacking! Listen to Dinner Party Download and (don’t) hear how food sampling is successfully done. I’ve never wanted to pull out my earbuds listening to them.

  • Great podcast Alton! Suggestion, get Keith (High Road Craft Ice-Cream) as a competitor or part of a chef team on one of the multiple chef competition on Iron Chef. Keith is a trained executive chef so he could do either dessert(s) or tackle the mystery ingredient. Cheers!

  • Concerning the “Roman Incident.” I believe it stems from the very pervasive myth that Roman aristocrats would hold lavish feasts and were so glutinous that they had a dedicated room called a “vomitoria” where they would…make room in their stomachs…so they could eat more.

    However, this is not actually true at all and Rome actual had a fairly strict array of sumptuary laws prohibiting excess feasting except for special holidays like Bacchanal.

    My guess is that this myth comes from the misinterpretation of the word “vomitorium” (plural: vomtioria). The confusion is understandable as both our modern definition of “vomit” and “vomitorium” have the same Latin root definition which is “to spew forth.” The truth is most of us have been through a vomitorium at some point in our lives. If you’ve ever entered a stadium to find your seats, that sort of tunnel with seats an either side and above is a vomitorium. The audience is what “spews forth” from it.

    Modern vomitorium: http://orooasis.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/100_8394.jpg

    Brilliant podcast as always, thanks Alton!

  • Regarding the “Roman Incident”

    It refers to ancient Rome, when, at a lavish feast, wealthy Romans would tickle their throats with a feather, inducing themselves to vomit, so that they would have room to continue eating.

  • Yes! Great show! More podcasts like this!

    I Love the interviews. There’s 100 websites and podcasts out there that do food news. And more news-heavy shows are less “evergreen”. But interviews are what really play to the strengths of podcasting and Alton Brown’s charm. The exception is probably the more personal news about AB. Not personal like gossip stuff, I mean things like progress with any interesting food-related projects, or recent discoveries of delicious food.

  • I love Good Eats, I love Iron Chef America, I love all things I’ve seen that you, AB, do. You bring a geekiness – science, intellectuality, etc – to food, which is just fantastic. I’m super excited about this podcast, but seriously, desperately, PLEASE stop smacking, slurping, gnashing, eating into the microphone. You can – and should – eat the food you’re sampling, but it’s so easy to just back off the mic and not make your listeners have to endure the unbearableness of the sounds of essentially being inside someone’s mouth while they masticate. Maybe not all of them find it unbearable, but to those who do… It’s just the worst, and makes it a severe detractor to wanting to listen.
    An article form NY Times about misophonia: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/06/health/06annoy.html
    I’m sure I represent a minority, but I’d be willing to wager it’s a far greater minority than the one who would insist that the eating into the microphone absolutely must be heard in every salivary detail.

  • Alton,
    Enjoying the podcast very much. Regarding the usage of “Roman Incedent,” by the IFOCE. I believe it is reference to the ancient Roman propensity for vomiting at banquets and bacchanals. At large Roman feasts it was not uncommon for guests to gorge themselves on victuals and wine, and then vomit in order to eat and drink even more. At Bacchanals, ritualistic sessions of eating and drinking in excess in order to worship Bacchus, vomiting was a normal means of extending one’s ability to worship longer.

  • AB, outstanding show this week. Your interview with Keith Schroeder is EXACTLY the kind of thing I was hoping for when you announced the podcast. More like this, please.

  • I will be commenting as I listen: My GOD I love your voice. Especially the way you say “Food Quotes”….
    I feel the same way about food contests and please don’t make a documentary about it… I would be so torn, it’s got you in it, YAY… but its about food contests, Blech.
    I don’t like ice cream. I have finally come to the point in my life where I no longer apologize for this. But it is a socially awkward opinion. heheh.
    …Okay but now I do want to try this guys Ice cream kind of after hearing this.
    Raspberry Rhubarb Mmmmmm I think that one would be very good.
    Ice Cream trucks are LEGIT!
    Taking phone calls now, how does one know when & where to call in?
    Thank you for treating us with another Podcast Alton!!!!