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Episode 7

Terrified

Drew Koshgarian

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Terrified #7: Drew Koshgarian

This week’s guest is Drew Koshgarian.  She’s a great writer and a great friend of Dave’s, and the two delve deep into the fears and worries of an aspiring writer and comedian.  Finding a balance between art and mental health dominates the discussion, but they also touch on feminism, positivity, respect amongst friends, and Alanis Morrissette.

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4 comments

  • […] So I talked about the podcast Terrified in my last post and I’ve almost listened to all the available episodes. It’s really great! One of my favourites has been the episode with Drew Koshgarian. They kind of naturally fall into this great conversation about feminism, comedy and psychology that’s really engaging. One of the things I like so much about this podcast is that Dave Ross seems so open to other people’s points of view, and in this particular episode you can hear a light-bulb moment or two in the sound of his voice that’s really neat. Not that I’ve found him out of touch with feminism in his other episodes, but the conversation they have in this one is a great example of how even people who consider themselves inclusive in their personal politics can forget their privilege (myself included – mostly straight white lady here). Drew Koshgarian was awesome, and she also spoke about the intersection between her personal ethics and comedy which was enlightening. Listen to it! […]

  • The bit about who it’s funniest to claim to have killed really had me wondering. Do a little thought experiment with me: which is funnier in all of the following pairings?

    Male comic says it, about his girlfriend… or about a male friend?
    Female comic says it, about her boyfriend… or about a female friend?
    Male comic says it, about his boyfriend… or about a male friend?
    Female comic says it, about her girlfriend… or about a female friend?

    Isn’t killing the romantic partner always going to seem instinctively funnier, regardless of gender, because of the violation of trust that’s involved there? Or am I wrong?

    Of course, gender could still be a factor. (I get that jokes can violate multiple taboos simultaneously, and all.) You could control to test that instead — make the imaginary murder victims the comic’s male and female platonic friends, and so on.

    Fuckin’ love the podcast, btw.