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The Shelf: HOUSE OF CARDS, THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL, THE LEGO MOVIE

You are entering another dimension. A dimension not just of sight and sound, but of sitting and remote controls. A dimension where every week several pieces of entertainment are released to an unwitting public to consume with their faces and brains for the betterment of their entire heart. That signpost up ahead… ignore it; you shouldn’t be driving anyway in your condition. You are entering The Shelf. Well, not entering, but looking at. Don’t climb onto a shelf, it probably won’t fit you. Unless it’s really huge or made of oak or something. Anyway, it’s The Shelf.

House of Cards Season Two
The Emmy-nominated Netflix series about political intrigue and the machinations of a ruthless Southern Congressman (Kevin Spacey) had a pretty explosive second year, which we won’t discuss here because of spoilers galore, but if you don’t have Netflix, or just want to watch physical media, you can do so with this Blu-ray set. It contains no supplemental content, though, so use your best judgment.

The Grand Budapest Hotel
Wes Anderson keeps reinventing himself without changing his style or tactic at all. Some say that’s a downside, but I think if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. With his previous two films, The Fantastic Mr. Fox and Moonrise Kingdom, he’d delved a bit more than he had into true storybook adventures, and with this film he’s planted himself squarely into a pre-WWII caper/thriller. It’s arguably his best work since The Royal Tenenbaums, I think. To read my full review of the Blu-ray and film, please click right here, dahling.

The LEGO Movie
I can’t think of a funnier, more heartfelt, more innovative movie in the last several years than Chris Miller and Phil Lord’s The LEGO Movie. The animation alone, which is based entirely around stop-motion of actual LEGO bricks (which had to have taken forever), is reason to heap mounds of praise on it, but it’s one of the funniest scripts in a movie in a good long time and also has some really good messages, perfect for young kids who feel like they aren’t very special. Plus, dudes, it has Batman in it being a dick, which is always something funny to me. Because, even though I love him, he’d totally be a dick in real life. Or LEGO life. The “Everything is Awesome” Edition Blu-ray has a commentary by Lord and Miller and several short featurettes about the building of the various LEGO items. It’s a movie I can’t recommend enough. Get it, get it, get it. SPACESHIP! Here’s Witney’s full review of the film as well as all of our other coverage of The LEGO Movie.

I Know That Voice
Voice actor extraordinaire John DiMaggio (Futurama, Adventure Time) co-produced this comprehensive look at all the great voices you know but the faces you might not. Featuring interviews with greats in the field like Billy West, Mark Hamill, Tom Kenny, Jim Cummings, and Kevin Conroy, the documentary gives you an up close and person look at these people that most of us have grown up hearing. It’s a labor of love and it definitely feels like one. Read my interview from last year with DiMaggio about the film and his work.

The Machine
Don’t build the perfect weapon and give her feelings if you don’t want her to raise some hell. This cool cyberpunk take on Pinocchio stars Arrow‘s Caity Lotz as the eponymous weapon and Toby Stephens and Wedge Antilles himself Denis Lawson as the creators trying to keep her under wraps.

Walk of Shame
Comedy starring Elizabeth Banks as a newscaster who has a night on the town and ends up lost and in last night’s evening wear trying to get back to an important work meeting lest she gets fired. Hilarity ensues, probably.

The Angela Mao Ying Collection
Get your next three chopsocky double feature nights planned with this set of six films featuring ’70s martial arts superstar Angela Mao Ying, beginning with the below film, 1973’s When Taekwondo Strikes. En-friggin’-joy.

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