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Look Out, Science! “Bang Goes the Theory” Comes to BBC America

Fans of Mythbusters, science, and British things will want to pay attention to the new series Bang Goes the Theory which is premiering on BBC America Monday, February 11th, after Top Gear. The show, which is already a hit over in the UK, will feature a series of stunts and experiments as well as investigations into current technology from scientists in a number of different fields and questions about the world in which we live. For example, have you ever wondered about artificial intelligence, how the real CSI is able to do what they do, why clouds are white, or what would happen if you tried to build a boat out of ice? You’re not weird, and this is the show that will quell all those very specific worries.

There’s a lot of material to cover, but they’ve got the right people for that. Host Dallas Campbell is joined by biochemist Liz Bonnin, engineer Jem Stansfield, and evolutionary biologist Dr. Yan Wong as they attempt to look science in its face and not get scared. The first episode features an investigation into “Big Brother” technology (presumably beyond allowing oneself to be filmed for a reality show), an experiment to cook an egg with a piece of newspaper, and an attempt to blow a brick house down with a vortex cannon. Take THAT, third little pig. Also, why were we not informed that there was a thing called a vortex cannon?

To see how they pull it off, and all kinds of other scientific whatsits, check out Bang Goes the Theory on Monday, February 11th, at 10:20pm ET/PT on BBC America, after a brand new episode of Top Gear, which will feature people talking about cars.

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4 comments

  • Bang goes the theory is -hard- science, but it’s being done by people who have a handle on the subjects being discussed.

    It’s absolutely awesome to watch, and instructional .. nothing like mythbusters. Each week they explore two or three related subjects, with demonstrations and explanations.

    Examples — they built a huge indoor tower, to study how snow is created, to make actual snowflakes (vs just blown ice)

    They built a whole house, where a family lived for a day without knowing where the power came from. It came from a building FULL of bicycles being pedaled furiously, all human powered. From the TV to the microwave, from the oven to the lights, it all came directly from the people pedaling.

    Two of the hosts studied different kinds of alternative fuels. One made methane gas from a digester (by fermenting cookies), the other made alcohol fuel from apple cider, and they ran two mopeds on the fuel.

    It’s an amazing exploration of science, with a bit of art, and tons of interesting information thrown in the mix.

    -M